The Via Francigena in Switzerland

The Via Francigena in Switzerland runs through a variety of landscapes and is without doubt also one of the most spectacular pilgrims’ paths in Europe. The route from Sainte-Croix to Vuiteboeuf leads past unique sections of cart tracks then alongside the quiet Venoge to Lac Léman. Stops at Romainmôtier Abbey and the Roman mosaics in Orbe are highly recommended.

From Lausanne, the ViaFrancigena runs through the vineyards of Lavaux to the bend in the Rhone. From the ancient city of Octodurus, it winds through the narrow pass shaped by the wild waters of the Drance to the northern slopes of the Grossen Sankt Bernhard-Pass. In Val d’Entremont, medieval villages line the route, which peaks in the aptly-named Combe des Morts.

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On foot from the Great St Bernard Pass to Rome

The Via Francigena pedestrian path in Italy is approximately 1000 km long, from the Great St Bernard to Rome, divided into 45 legs.

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On foot from Colle del Monginevro to Vercelli

Since ancient times, the Valle di Susa has been one of the favoured areas for the crossing from Italy to beyond the Alps, thanks to the Monginevro and Moncenisio passes. The Middle Ages established is prominent role, even in Europe, as a transit route for merchants, armies, nobles, clergymen and pilgrims on their way to Rome or Santiago de Compostela. Hospitali, xenodochia, inns and hotels or places of aid emerged along the route. The way proceeds with this varied panorama for over 170 km with two historical variants, starting from the Moncenisio and the Monginevro towards the valley floor, until arriving at the threshold of Turin and, from there, Vercelli.  

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Cycling from the Great Saint Bernard Pass to Rome by bike

The Via Francigena cycling route runs from the Great Saint Bernard Pass to Rome following where it is possible the walking route, and avoiding the not-cyclable parts of the route. 

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