The Via Francigena in France

The Via Francigena stretch in France is approved by Fédération Française de la Randonnée Pédestre and marked as GR145®.
GR® are long-distance footpaths in France featuring a good standard of safety and quality of the route. We inform you that site upgrade is ongoing to complete the list of stages in French territory, including gps maps and descriptions. The route of the Via Francigena runs from Calais, Hauts-de-France Region, then Reims in the Grand Est Region, to the Swiss border, near Jougne and the village of Les Fourgs in the Bourgogne Franche-Comté Region. Accommodation Accommodation Hauts-de-France Accommodation Grand-Est Accommodation Bourgogne-Franche-Comté   Information and GPS tracks provided by the Fédération Française de Randonnée

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The Via Francigena in England

The Via Francigena starts just next to the southern portico of Canterbury’s cathedral where the milestone zero of the route is located. The pilgrim’s passport are available in the information centre inside the cathedral. After having left aside the cathedral passing through Christchurch Gate, turn left and keep on walking headed for Burgate; then along Church Street and Longport walking along Abbey of Saint Augustin’s side. After having walked beyond Nord Holmes Road and Saint Martin Church, turn right into Pilgrim Street following indications to get to North Downs Way. The road that leads to Dover is about 30 km long and is travelled in 7 to 8 hours walking. It’s easy to get back to Canterbury by taking the train in the following stations: Bekesbourne, Adisham, Aylesham, Sherpherdswell and Dover Priory. Information provided by Canterbury City Council
 
Reaching Canterbury departing from Paris: By train : Take the Eurostar train in Paris Nord station to Ashford international (from € 185 – early booking recommended). Departures at 11.10 am and 8.10 pm (2 per day) apart from Saturdays and Sundays (no trains, please take ferries instead).
Take the train in Ashford international station to Canterbury West (€ 9,32 or £ 8). 3 departures per hour between 6.05 am and 1.07 am the following day. By bus : Take the bus in Paris Bercy bus station to Dover east ferry harbour (from € 19 – out of high season). With company Ouibus (the cheapest), one departure at 9 am and another one at 11 pm (2 per day, between 7 and 7.30 hour trip).

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The Via Francigena in Switzerland

The Via Francigena in Switzerland runs through a variety of landscapes and is without doubt also one of the most spectacular pilgrims’ paths in Europe. The route from Sainte-Croix to Vuiteboeuf leads past unique sections of cart tracks then alongside the quiet Venoge to Lac Léman. Stops at Romainmôtier Abbey and the Roman mosaics in Orbe are highly recommended.

From Lausanne, the ViaFrancigena runs through the vineyards of Lavaux to the bend in the Rhone. From the ancient city of Octodurus, it winds through the narrow pass shaped by the wild waters of the Drance to the northern slopes of the Grossen Sankt Bernhard-Pass. In Val d’Entremont, medieval villages line the route, which peaks in the aptly-named Combe des Morts.

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On foot from the Great St Bernard Pass to Rome

The Via Francigena pedestrian path in Italy is approximately 1000 km long, from the Great St Bernard to Rome, divided into 45 legs.

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On foot from Colle del Monginevro to Vercelli

Since ancient times, the Valle di Susa has been one of the favoured areas for the crossing from Italy to beyond the Alps, thanks to the Monginevro and Moncenisio passes. The Middle Ages established is prominent role, even in Europe, as a transit route for merchants, armies, nobles, clergymen and pilgrims on their way to Rome or Santiago de Compostela. Hospitali, xenodochia, inns and hotels or places of aid emerged along the route. The way proceeds with this varied panorama for over 170 km with two historical variants, starting from the Moncenisio and the Monginevro towards the valley floor, until arriving at the threshold of Turin and, from there, Vercelli.  

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Cycling from the Great Saint Bernard Pass to Rome by bike

The Via Francigena cycling route runs from the Great Saint Bernard Pass to Rome following where it is possible the walking route, and avoiding the not-cyclable parts of the route. 

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