Latest Itineraries

Leg B13 - Alternative path sea

From Marina di Massa some nice cycle paths lead us to Forte dei Marmi and Pietrasanta.

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Leg B12 - Alternative path sea

From Luni we continue towards the coast to later follow coastal roads until Marina di Massa. Starting from Aulla with this variant shortens the leg at 47.8 km and you avoid the climb after Avenza.

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Leg B18 - Alternative path Via Cassia

This alternative path avoids the unpaved slope on the road that goes from San Quirico to Vignoni Alto and Bagno Vignoni, and follows the Via Cassia

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Leg 36 - Variation Abbadia San Salvatore

The variation for Abbadia San Salvatore distances from the Official Path a little previous of the Post Office of Ricorsi, by the bar of the road that leads to the agritourism "Il Poderino".

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Leg 27 - From Camaiore to Lucca

From Camaiore the leg rises up to Monte Magno from where the path follows the SP1, that in some points is pretty dangerous because of the traffic.
Once raised to Piazzano you will descend the valley of the Contesola creek 

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Leg 26 - From Massa to Camaiore

This leg rises to the Aghinolfi Castle to access a panoramic way, that needs to be covered carefully because of the traffic.
The leg continues towards Pietrasanta, "the small Italian Athens",

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Leg 25 - From Sarzana to Massa

The leg is flat; the main attractive is the archeological area of Luni, ancient Roman harbour where the pilgrims used to board towards Santiago. 

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Leg 24 - From Aulla to Sarzana

The majority of the leg is on dirt road, it is quite demanding, very beautiful and it gifts the traveler with the first view of the sea.
The atmospheres of the ancient villages along the way are really interesting,

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VFF38 - From Culmont-Chalindrey to Coublanc

Last stage before nearby Burgundy... or first steps in Champagne, according to the direction.

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VFF37 - From Langres to Culmont-Chalindrey

This stage is an opportunity to discover another facet of the Langres plateau. Marking the limit between Champagne and Burgundy, this limestone plateau has an important karstic network from which many rivers have their source.

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VFF36 - From Faverolles to Langres

Surrounded by 3.5km of ramparts flanked by 12 towers, Langres awaits for the walker from the top of its landscaped plateau, occupied since ancient Gaul.

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VFF35 - From Richebourg to Faverolles

Crossing the deep forests of Haute-Marne, the Via Francigena passes through the village of Mormant and near an old main crossroads of Roman roads whose remains can still be seen near a mausoleum.

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VFF34 - From Orges to Richebourg

During this stage, the Via Francigena crosses the city of Chateauvillain. Its image is often associated with the 272 hectare park where many fallow deers live, which makes the walkers happy.

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VFF33 - From Baroville to Orges

It was in 1115, on the borders between Champagne and Burgundy, that the future Bernard of Clairvaux, accompanied by 12 monks from Citeaux, came to open up a forest clearing in the Val d'Absinthe.

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VFF32 - From Dolancourt to Baroville

During this stage, a stop in Bar-sur-Aube is a must. At the crossroads of North and South, the city took a strategic importance and location for trade during the period of the Counts of Champagne.

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VFF31 - From Dienville to Dolancourt

Dienville marks the eastern end of the Forêt d'Orient lakes.

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VFF30 - From Précy-Saint-Martin to Dienville

The Via Francigena meets in Brienne Castle the story of a famous character: Napoleon Bonaparte.

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VFF29 - From Chavanges to Précy Saint Martin

During this stage, the pilgrim heading for Rome is invited to make a stop at Rosnay l'Hôpital whose church exceptionally presents a crypt.

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VFF28 - From Outine to Chavanges

Although half-timbered architecture is common, its use in religious architecture remains original.

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VFF27 - From Saint-Rémy-en-Bouzemont to Outines

The champagne bocage of Pays du Der gradually succeeds the cereal plains and vineyards.

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